Meet Me in Idaho Springs: The Decision

The dilemma was Halloween.  In Idaho Springs if you didn’t dress up people asked if you had been ill.  Ricky’s trademark costume was a witch with long spider web fingernails and a hat that made it hard to walk through the average doorway, but last year the hat had blown off and landed in the street where it was trampled by a guy on a Vespa that was covered in orange lights.  So now she had no hat, and you couldn’t be a proper witch without one.  She was feeling a little panicked because tonight was the night that the Main Street businesses would be open for trick or treating and general milling around.  Asta was serving her “Creepy Caldron Coffee” that came with a plastic spider on the side of the cup, Josh and Michelli would be handing out miniature whoopee pies with cobweb frosting, and the brewery had some sort of bat-wing brew for patrons to sample.  Ricky made jewelry, all by hand with semi-precious stones and some intricate detail.  Trick or treaters to her studio would get their name in a drawing for a chance to win her onyx and coral pendant that she had just completed.  She called it “Black Heart” in keeping with the holiday.  She was expecting a crowd and couldn’t greet them without a costume.  That’s when she decided to go to the new consignment store and get a dress and possibly a wig that could make her look like her great Aunt Pearl.  She would put on too bright lipstick and tuck a hanky into her cleavage, and her witch shoes could easily double as Aunt Pearl footwear.  She ran across the street into the store, and there he was-the Ryan Reynolds guy, behind the counter.  She should have looked more closely at the card he gave her where it said he was the proprietor of “Repeat Performance”, the new consignment shop in town.  He was wearing a dark gray sweatshirt and jeans, and he looked like he belonged.  Ricky pulled his card out of her coat pocket and looked at his name.  If you were going to buy an old ladies dress from someone, it was only right to introduce yourself.

Making Whoopie in the Rocky Mountains

A Whoopie Pie is like a sandwich made with two soft cookies with a fluffy white filling.  The original and most commonly made Whoopie Pie is chocolate, but cooks like to experiment, and today a variety of flavors have become popular.

Whoopie Pies are a New England phenomenon and some Mainers have even claimed that they were weaned on Whoopie Pies. 

So, how do you get an authentic New England Whoopie Pie here in the mountains of Colorado? Come on out to The Big Chili Cook-Off in Evergreen on September 11, 2011, where Mainstreet Restaurant will have a vendor booth featuring these spectacular desserts, made in-house at their restaurant with a tried-and-true New England recipe. While you’re there, enjoy the art, the music, the other scrumptious food and the chili & beer ~ all in support of our mountain area volunteer fire departments!

Homemade

There are lots of fabulous restaurants out there. One in particular (which will remain unnamed) has this hollandaise sauce that they serve with several egg dishes. One morning, I commented to my husband how much I liked it, and he told me it was canned – the restaurant simply heated it up. I was disappointed, to say the least. If I want food that is just ‘heated up,’ I can open the cans and do it myself. When I go out to eat, I want something special – something I can’t get anywhere else.

Mainstreet Restaurant is the place to get those special dishes with homemade taste. Our bread is made in-house, our desserts are made in-house, we even roast our meats ourselves. If you’re in the mood for food that carries the signature of the cook, food with that special flair, well — there’s a table waiting for you at Mainstreet.

Making Whoopie

A Whoopie Pie is like a sandwich made with two soft cookies with a fluffy white filling.  The original and most commonly made Whoopie Pie is chocolate, but cooks like to experiment, and today a variety of flavors have become popular.

Whoopie Pies are a New England phenomenon and some Mainers have even claimed that they were weaned on Whoopie Pies. However, the recipe for Whoopie Pies has its origins with the Amish, and in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, it is not uncommon to find roadside farm stands offering these desserts. These cake-like Whoopie Pies were considered a special treat in Amish families because they were originally made from leftover batter. According to Amish legend, when children would find these treats in their lunch bags, they would shout “Whoopie!”

New England’s earliest claim to Whoopie Pie fame is from the Labadie’s Bakery in Lewiston, Massachusetts. They first started selling Whoopie Pies in 1925 with the opening of their bakery. The Labadie’s Bakery remains in the same location today, and in the meanwhile, authentic Whoopie Pies have become iconic of New England.

So, how do you get an authentic New England Whoopie Pie here in the mountains of Colorado? Come on out to The Big Chili Cook-Off in Evergreen on September 11, 2011, where Mainstreet Restaurant will have a vendor booth featuring these spectacular desserts, made in-house at their restaurant with a tried-and-true New England recipe. Or, if you simply can’t wait until September, head on over to Idaho Springs and visit Mainstreet Restaurant yourself. Treat yourself to a little party in your mouth, and you may find yourself yelling, “Whoopie!”